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Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Cartoon
From Schneier on Security

Friday Squid Blogging: Squid Cartoon

Lio.

"Security Theater in New York City"
From Schneier on Security

"Security Theater in New York City"

For the U.N. General Assembly: For those entranced by security theater, New York City is a sight to behold this week. A visit to one of the two centers of the...

Proving a Computer Program's Correctness
From Schneier on Security

Proving a Computer Program's Correctness

This is interesting: Professor Gernot Heiser, the John Lions Chair in Computer Science in the School of Computer Science and Engineering and a senior principal...

Nice Use of Diversion During a Robbery
From Schneier on Security

Nice Use of Diversion During a Robbery

During a daring bank robbery in Sweden that involved a helicopter, the criminals disabled a police helicopter by placing a package with the word "bomb" near the...

Reproducing Keys from Photographs
From Schneier on Security

Reproducing Keys from Photographs

Reproducing keys from distant and angled photographs: Abstract:The access control provided by a physical lock is based on the assumption that the information content...

Immediacy Affects Risk Assessments
From Schneier on Security

Immediacy Affects Risk Assessments

New experiment demonstrates what we already knew: That's because people tend to view their immediate emotions, such as their perceptions of threats or risks, as...

The Doghouse: Crypteto
From Schneier on Security

The Doghouse: Crypteto

Crypteto has a 49,152-bit symmetric key: The most important issue of any encryption product is the 'bit key strength'. To date the strongest known algorithm has...

The Problem of Vague Laws
From Schneier on Security

The Problem of Vague Laws

The average American commits three felonies a day: the title of a new book by Harvey Silverglate. More specifically, the problem is the intersection of vague laws...

Predicting Characteristics of People by the Company they Keep
From Schneier on Security

Predicting Characteristics of People by the Company they Keep

Turns out "gaydar" can be automated: Using data from the social network Facebook, they made a striking discovery: just by looking at a person's online friends,...

Unauthentication
From Schneier on Security

Unauthentication

In computer security, a lot of effort is spent on the authentication problem. Whether it's passwords, secure tokens, secret questions, image mnemonics, or something...

Ass Bomber
From Schneier on Security

Ass Bomber

Nobody tell the TSA, but last month someone tried to assassinate a Saudi prince by exploding a bomb stuffed in his rectum. He pretended to be a repentant militant...

A Stick Figure Guide to AES
From Schneier on Security

A Stick Figure Guide to AES

Nice.

Friday Squid Blogging: 20-Foot Squid Caught in the Gulf of Mexico
From Schneier on Security

Friday Squid Blogging: 20-Foot Squid Caught in the Gulf of Mexico

First one sighted in the Gulf since 1954: The new specimen, weighing 103 pounds, was found during a preliminary survey of the Gulf during which scientists hope...

Texas Instruments Signing Keys Broken
From Schneier on Security

Texas Instruments Signing Keys Broken

Texas Instruments' calculators use RSA digital signatures to authenticate any updates to their operating system. Unfortunately, their signing keys are too short...

<i>The Onion</i> on Security
From Schneier on Security

The Onion on Security

"Authorities Called in to Examine Suspicious-Looking Ham."

Sears Spies on its Customers
From Schneier on Security

Sears Spies on its Customers

It's not just hackers who steal financial and medical information: Between April 2007 and January 2008, visitors to the Kmart and Sears web sites were invitedSony...

Monopoly Sets for WWII POWs: More Information
From Schneier on Security

Monopoly Sets for WWII POWs: More Information

I already blogged about this; there's more information in this new article: Included in the items the German army allowed humanitarian groups to distribute in...

Eliminating Externalities in Financial Security
From Schneier on Security

Eliminating Externalities in Financial Security

This is a good thing: An Illinois district court has allowed a couple to sue their bank on the novel grounds that it may have failed to sufficiently secure their...

Hacking Two-Factor Authentication
From Schneier on Security

Hacking Two-Factor Authentication

Back in 2005, I wrote about the failure of two-factor authentication to mitigate banking fraud: Here are two new active attacks we're starting to see: Man-in-the...

Quantum Computer Factors the Number 15
From Schneier on Security

Quantum Computer Factors the Number 15

This is an important development: Shor's algorithm was first demonstrated in a computing system based on nuclear magnetic resonance -- manipulating molecules in...
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